Tag Archives: bell pepper

Wiener Casserole

This dish is much like the Frankfurter Bake; they are both pasta and wiener dishes.  When I took this casserole out of the oven, the first aroma that met my nose was the cooked bell pepper.  I like that smell, and love stuffed peppers. I think this dish is milder than the frankfurter dish; it is probably due to the mustard and brown sugar used in the frankfurter dish. In my mind, either dish is a simple, easy-to-make casserole that you will enjoy. And because they have both your meat and pasta, they are a good base for your meal.

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Wiener Casserole

  • 8 oz. elbow macaroni
  • 1 lb. wieners
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 3 oz. cream cheese
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 Tablespoon dried, minced onion
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cook macaroni as package directs. Cut wieners into 1″ chunks. Chop bell pepper into 1/2″ dice. Mix together well the cream cheese, sour cream, milk, onion, and mustard; Mix in the macaroni, wieners, and bell pepper. Top with cheddar cheese. Bake 30 minutes.

If I have any hints for this casserole, it would do with the mixing of the sauce. The cream cheese is difficult to break up, and I was getting a sore arm using the whisk, so I took out the hand-held mixer and used electricity to do the mixing in just a few minutes.

The other place I would watch is if your cooking of the macaroni gets ahead of your other preparations. I noticed on the macaroni package that it suggests tossing the drained macaroni with a small amount of oil if it isn’t to be used immediately. I should have done that. Mine sat in the colander while I was working on the sauce, and it stuck together; it broke up easy enough when I incorporated it with the rest of the ingredients, so it isn’t really a problem, just an alert.

The recipe is remiss in that it doesn’t state a baking dish size; I chose my 9 x 13 inch dish, and it seems to be correct. I also sprayed the cooking dish with cooking spray; I don’t know if that is really necessary but I chose to use some of the information from the Frankfurter Bake casserole dish as hints for this dish.

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When I served this casserole, it did not stick together tightly as the frankfurter dish did, and so required spooning out a serving rather than cutting and lifting the serving. I suspect part of that is the macaroni is smaller than the noodles in the frankfurter dish, and the noodles then stick together better. But of course, the gluten in the flour and the butter would tend to make a tighter dish also. However, later as I was preparing the left-overs for the freezer/refrigerator, the pasta had stuck together and I was able to cut the casserole and lift the servings into my storage pieces.

Pico De Gallo type Salsa

A few days ago I was thinking about what to have for supper, and felt I wanted something fresh to go with my meat. I knew I had a jalapeno in the refrigerator, and my Juliet tomato plants were starting to produce a handful of fresh tomatoes each day. I also have part of a dry onion in the refrigerator; it is one of those things I try to keep on hand. All those ingredients sound like the start of a fresh Pico De Gallo salsa.

I was wondering what was missing, and looked in Marlys’s recipe book to see what she might have said. Sure enough, she has a recipe called Salsa which sounds a lot like the Pico De Gallo for which I was looking. And as the picture shows, what I made looks like a Pico De Gallo salsa, too.

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Salsa

Developed by Marlys Crary, Cinco de Mayo, 2001)

  • 4 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 1/3 white onion, finely diced
  • 1/8 green bell pepper, finely diced
  • 1 Jalapeno pepper, finely diced
  • 1 Tablespoon parsley, dried
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • small amount of olive oil to moisten

May add either or both:

1 can black beans, rinsed

1 cup frozen corn kernels, (or 1 can)

I was short on the Bell Pepper, so I left it out. I didn’t exactly measure the ingredients because I was using my Juliet tomatoes instead of the Roma tomatoes she lists; the Juliet is a cherry tomato with a texture like the Roma tomato- very meaty and not a lot of the center pulp.

I used fresh parsley right out of my herb garden, and as I have said in other recipes, once I cut it to bring it into the house, I tend to use all of it unmeasured.

I added a handful of frozen corn kernels; I put them in a sieve and ran water over them to get rid of the frost, and then dried them on paper towels. And, I added a bit of lime juice- not called for in Marlys’s recipe.

I think what is to be taken away from this exercise is that you want to capture the basics of a recipe, but you shouldn’t be a slave to it; you need to improvise with what you have, and have fun cooking. I think my spur-of-the-moment salsa turned out just as I wanted. It was fresh, and gave the meat a different taste that I enjoyed.