Tag Archives: cream cheese

Wiener Casserole

This dish is much like the Frankfurter Bake; they are both pasta and wiener dishes.  When I took this casserole out of the oven, the first aroma that met my nose was the cooked bell pepper.  I like that smell, and love stuffed peppers. I think this dish is milder than the frankfurter dish; it is probably due to the mustard and brown sugar used in the frankfurter dish. In my mind, either dish is a simple, easy-to-make casserole that you will enjoy. And because they have both your meat and pasta, they are a good base for your meal.

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Wiener Casserole

  • 8 oz. elbow macaroni
  • 1 lb. wieners
  • 1 green bell pepper
  • 3 oz. cream cheese
  • 1 cup sour cream
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1 Tablespoon dried, minced onion
  • 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard
  • 1/2 cup grated cheddar cheese

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Cook macaroni as package directs. Cut wieners into 1″ chunks. Chop bell pepper into 1/2″ dice. Mix together well the cream cheese, sour cream, milk, onion, and mustard; Mix in the macaroni, wieners, and bell pepper. Top with cheddar cheese. Bake 30 minutes.

If I have any hints for this casserole, it would do with the mixing of the sauce. The cream cheese is difficult to break up, and I was getting a sore arm using the whisk, so I took out the hand-held mixer and used electricity to do the mixing in just a few minutes.

The other place I would watch is if your cooking of the macaroni gets ahead of your other preparations. I noticed on the macaroni package that it suggests tossing the drained macaroni with a small amount of oil if it isn’t to be used immediately. I should have done that. Mine sat in the colander while I was working on the sauce, and it stuck together; it broke up easy enough when I incorporated it with the rest of the ingredients, so it isn’t really a problem, just an alert.

The recipe is remiss in that it doesn’t state a baking dish size; I chose my 9 x 13 inch dish, and it seems to be correct. I also sprayed the cooking dish with cooking spray; I don’t know if that is really necessary but I chose to use some of the information from the Frankfurter Bake casserole dish as hints for this dish.

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When I served this casserole, it did not stick together tightly as the frankfurter dish did, and so required spooning out a serving rather than cutting and lifting the serving. I suspect part of that is the macaroni is smaller than the noodles in the frankfurter dish, and the noodles then stick together better. But of course, the gluten in the flour and the butter would tend to make a tighter dish also. However, later as I was preparing the left-overs for the freezer/refrigerator, the pasta had stuck together and I was able to cut the casserole and lift the servings into my storage pieces.

Strawberry Devonshire Tart

Strawberry Tart 002I have made this tart several times; it is easy, and is a real treat for the strawberry lovers. I particularly like the balance of the cream cheese and sour cream against the sugar in the glaze. The result is that the pie is not excessively sweet.

Here is how to make this tasty tart.

Strawberry Devonshire Tart

  • 9 or 10 inch pastry shell, baked and cooled.

  • 8 oz. cream cheese, softened
  • 6 Tablespoons sour cream

  • 1 to 1 1/2 quarts strawberries

  • 1 cup sugar
  • 3 Tablespoons cornstarch
  • Red food coloring

Beat cream cheese until fluffy. Add sour cream and beat until smooth. Spread on bottom of pie shell and refrigerate.

Wash and hull berries. Mash enough uneven ones to make 1 cup. Force through a sieve and add water to make 1 cup juice, discarding berries.

Mix the sugar and the cornstarch together. Add 1/2 cup water and the berry juice. Cook over medium heat, stirring, until mixture is clear and thickened; then boil 1 minute. Stir to cool slightly and add a little red food coloring if necessary.

Fill shell with remaining berries, tips up, and pour cooked mixture over the top evenly. Chill 1 hour before serving.

For the pastry shell, I buy the frozen kind and then blind bake it. It use to be that we would fill the shell with dry beans to keep it from rising, but the directions now are to prick it all over with a fork. The directions on the shells I bought said to bake at 400 degrees for 7-9 minutes; I thought it came out perfect.

We no longer seem to buy strawberries by the pint basket; I bought a 3 pound container of berries, and I think that maybe the weight follows the old saw about “ a pint a pound the world around”. So my 3 pounds would have been 1½ quarts. That was plenty of strawberries with about a half dozen left over.

To decide how many berries I can afford to mash and use for the juice, I take a second pie tin and arrange the good looking berries to fill the space. This allows me to try to ensure the best berries are whole and in the pie shell, and not mashed.

To mash the “uneven” ones, I first spin them in the food processor; I suspect a potato masher would work, but the food processor really gets the juice flowing. I still put them through a strainer to eliminate any remaining pulp, and all those seeds.
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I hope you will make and enjoy this different type of a fruit pie.

Errol