Tag Archives: Green Beans

Green Beans with Tomatoes and Olive Oil

This recipe didn’t turn out quite the way I had wished it would, but it is a good vegetable recipe to go with your meat. By the time the green beans have become tender, the tomatoes have cooked to a pulp; I had hoped that the tomatoes would have kept their shape, and been fresher. My next step will be to try the combination again, but to try to create more like a salad.

However, this is still a valid recipe as a vegetable to accompany the meal. It probably is more oriented to cooler weather where we want warm dishes, than to the summer when a salad would be desired.

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Green Beans with Tomatoes and Olive Oil

  • 3 Tbs Olive Oil
  • 1 large sweet onion, thinly sliced
  • 3 large cloves garlic, cut in half
  • 12 ounces cherry tomatoes, cut in half
  • 1 pound green beans, trimmed
  • * salt and black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon balsamic or sherry vinegar

In a large skillet, heat the olive oil over medium-low heat. Add the sliced onion and garlic cloves and cook, stirring occasionally, for 8 to 10 minutes or until the onions begin to turn golden brown.Add the tomatoes and continue cooking until the tomatoes have collapsed and given up some of their juices. Add the green beans and season with plenty of salt and pepper. Cover and cook until the beans are tender, about 6 to 8 minutes.

Remove cover and continue to cook until the juices have thickened slightly, 3 or 4 minutes more. Taste and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, if necessary. Stir in the vinegar. Remove from heat and cool slightly. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Bring to room temperature before serving.

Potato Salad

This salad came to us from a visit one summer day to my brother John. He fixed a feed for us, and his roommate, whose name is forgotten, made a Potato Salad that was simple, yet very taste. It is a cold potato salad.
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This salad has very few ingredients. It has no mustard or pickles or any other explicit spices, but presents a clean taste of the potatoes and hard cooked eggs. I think you will enjoy it.

Potato Salad

(Brother John’s roommate)

  • 3 lb. small red potatoes, cooked.
  • 1 cruet Good Seasons Italian or Caesar dressing
  • 6-8 hard cooked eggs, coarsely chopped
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • sour cream to cover.

While still warm, dice and pour dressing over them. When cool, add eggs, salt, pepper and sour cream. Best served at room temperature.


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I am assuming that hard cooked eggs are not a problem; if you need help in that area, please send me a comment and I will reply. Likewise, if cooking the potatoes is a problem. I guess I do these often enough that I am assuming all my audience knows how to do these boiling operations.

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A different version of a potato salad that I enjoy is a recipe I got from Food Network Giada De Laurentiis called Warm Vegetable Salad. I am giving you a pointer to the salad.
It is surprising how many hits a google search for “Giada Warm Vegetable Salad” returns. It must be growing in popularity.

Giada starts with having you roast your red peppers, and then clean and skin them. Having made this salad a few times, I decided that it was easier to buy a jar of Roasted Red Peppers than to do the job myself. A jar contains about 4 peppers, so I use half the jar, and then freeze the other half; I don’t want it to go bad in the refrigerator. I still have to go over the peppers to check for skin and veins, so maybe I am kidding myself about the work.
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Giada says that putting the potatoes into boiling water will cook them in 10-12 minutes; I feel that is misleading – it depends on the size of the potatoes. Generally, when I go shopping, the potatoes are fairly large, and I test them with the tip of the knife for tenderness when I cook them. Sometimes it takes more like 30 minutes to get them tender.

As a result, I have started cutting the potatoes to their final size before putting them in the boiling water; now they tend to be done in the 10 – 12 minute range.

The biggest problem with the salad is that it needs to be made at the last minute, and served immediately. That is hard to do for a larger group, and besides, you want to be talking with your guests and not out in the kitchen.

However, if you decide to take this salad on, believe me the taste is well worth the effort. The lemon brings a bright note to the flavor, and the green beans and roasted pepper add color.

Boiled Dinner

This recipe is for an easy Boiled Dinner that is not like most Irish or New England Boiled Dinners. The recipe shows you how to make a Boiled Dinner without the sauerkraut or cabbage; those seem to turn a lot of people off. I think this is a good recipe for the tyro cook to learn and add to their repertoire.

The recipe in itself has an interesting history. We have had Boiled Dinner fairly often in the past. One day, after she left home for college, daughter Jenn called and wanted to know how to make Boiled Dinner. It was then that I discovered there was no recipe in Marlys’s Recipe Binder. Marlys gave Jenn instructions, and then Jenn wrote up this recipe for me to include in the Recipe Binders. This is the recipe as Jenn gave it to me, but I will comment about it and add my take on preparing it below.
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Boiled Dinner

(Jenn Crary)

  • potatoes, chopped in half or quarters
  • carrots, cut on an angle so pieces are around 2 inches
  • onion, whole pearl onions or one medium onion quartered
  • sausage- like kielbasa

Bring a large pot with about 2 inches of water to a boil. Add potatoes, carrots and onion to boiling water. Bring back to simmer and let simmer for 30 minutes. Add meat and let simmer for another 15 minutes.

An important factor in this meal is that you don’t need to worry about seasoning the food as you cook it. Instead, put a few condiments on the table and let each individual season their own meal. Now I like mild, creamy horseradish with my meat, and I like butter to melt over my potatoes and vegetables. Others might like mustard, or even catsup for the meat, and maybe sour cream for the potato. Just put the condiments on the table and let people do what they like.

This recipe can be made with almost any kind of encased meat- even hot dogs. We happen to like it with the kielbasa sausage. The kielbasa usually come at a weight of just under 1 pound; when Marlys and I got the sausage home, we would immediately cut it in half and freeze it as two meals- about 4 ounces per person per meal.

How much of each ingredient do you need? In general, I would use 3-5 ounces of each ingredient per person that will be eating dinner. Thus, cutting the kielbasa in half for two people allows about 3.5 ounces per person. I used 5 ounces of carrots, 4.5 ounces of new potato (red and Yukon Gold), and 3 ounces of onion per person in this demonstration. I had part of a yellow onion in the refrigerator and so used it instead of pearl onions.

While the recipe does not include green beans, I added 3 ounces per person because they are colorful, and I had them in the freezer. Being frozen, they only need to cook a couple minutes. I think the green beans work best if you cut them in half so they aren’t too long.

While Jenn’s recipe cooks everything at a simmer, I am the type that uses a heavy boil. Then, with things cut into bite-size pieces, it all cooks in about 15 minutes. So, I put everything except the green beans in the pot and boiled it hard for 15 minutes. I used a wok spider to take it all out of the boiling water and place it on the platter. I tented it with foil to keep it warm since I still had the beans to cook. I put the green beans in the boiling water, and as soon as it was boiling again, turned off the burner and let the beans sit in the hot water for 2 minutes. Now they were ready to come out and go onto the platter with everything else. That extra step might be enough to make you want to forget the beans.

If you don’t have a wok spider, you can use a colander in the sink and dump the pot of meat and vegetables into the colander to drain.

I hope you find this recipe easy to prepare and serve, and you enjoy it.
Errol