Tag Archives: onion

Baked Eggs

In my post about Christmas in Seattle, I mention that we had Baked Eggs for breakfast at Serious Biscuit. I have been experimenting with making them myself, and I think I have a good recipe now.

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I think one of the interesting things about the baked egg dish is that it has all of the capabilities that you find in an omelet but the eggs are not dried out and hard cooked; the eggs of a baked egg dish are more like poached eggs; the yolk is still separate and is cooked soft. And the flavoring of the dish can be anything you like with your eggs; I will be using a small amount of meat and cheese. At different times, I have used both diced ham, and crumbled bacon as my meat. I have used both scallions and yellow onion at different times. And I have used both straight shredded cheddar cheese, and a mix of cheeses with success. Again, your imagination is the limit to what you can do.

Perhaps the most difficult issue with this recipe is finding the right oven-safe dishes to use. They need to be about 10 ounce capacity for 2 eggs plus toppings. I have some small Corning casserole dishes that I like to use because they have a detachable handle I can use to move them into and out of the oven. I also have another set of Corning dishes with handles that work. Some people have ramekins that are large enough, but my largest ramekin is only 8 ounces.

So here is your base, starting recipe.

Baked Eggs

Ingredients

  • 1/2 Tbsp butter
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 oz. ham, diced
  • 1 oz. cheddar cheese, shredded
  • 1 oz. green onion, diced

Directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F. While the oven is heating, prepare the eggs and topping.

Break the 2 eggs into a small dish ready to use.

Chop and dice the topping meat, cheese and onion into a second small dish; mix the topping so it is ready to use.

When the oven is at heat, place the butter in the cooking dish and let it melt in the oven and warm the cooking dish. When it is melted, empty the eggs into the cooking dish, and then empty the toppings on top of the eggs.

Bake the eggs for 8 minutes.

I find that I need to let my eggs cool for about 5 minutes before I try to eat them; they are hot! But they are so enjoyable with the soft yellow yolks all in one piece, and the white also seems to be fluffier than any fried cooking style.

Pork Chops Evelyn

The other week, I decided I wanted a pork chop for supper. I remembered that Marlys had some good recipes for pork chops, and went looking for them. This recipe comes from her Aunt Evelyn Sheehan. Auntie gave us lots of good recipes; she was very active socially, and when her different groups would have a lunch or dinner, she was certain to pick up a new recipe or two.

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This recipe is very simple, and yet it has a nice taste. I could taste the lemon, and felt the texture of the onion slice; the onion is not cooked so hard that it is only a taste with no texture.

Pork Chops Evelyn

(Evelyn Sheehan)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees

  • Pork Chops
  • Onion, sliced about 1/4″ thick
  • Lemon, sliced about 1/8″ thick
  • catsup
  • brown sugar

Place on each chop (laid flat in a baking pan) an onion slice, a lemon slice, a tablespoon of catsup and a tablespoon of brown sugar.
Cover pan with foil and cook for 1 hour.

After cooking the pork chops a couple times, I made a modification to the recipe; it originally called for uncovering the baking pan after an hour and continuing to cook for another half hour. I felt that dried the pork chop out too much; cooking covered captures the moisture and leaves the pork chops more moist.

I also have a couple suggestions for this dish. First, since you need to cover the dish, you need a deep baking pan so the cover doesn’t squish the topping on the pork chop. I would say that the pan should be 2 -3 inches deep. Second, I found that the brown sugar didn’t splatter and burn so much if it is placed under the catsup rather than on top. When I placed the sugar at the top of the stack, I had quite a bit of burned sugar in the baking pan. (I still recommend Bar Keepers Friend for getting the burn out)

Pico De Gallo type Salsa

A few days ago I was thinking about what to have for supper, and felt I wanted something fresh to go with my meat. I knew I had a jalapeno in the refrigerator, and my Juliet tomato plants were starting to produce a handful of fresh tomatoes each day. I also have part of a dry onion in the refrigerator; it is one of those things I try to keep on hand. All those ingredients sound like the start of a fresh Pico De Gallo salsa.

I was wondering what was missing, and looked in Marlys’s recipe book to see what she might have said. Sure enough, she has a recipe called Salsa which sounds a lot like the Pico De Gallo for which I was looking. And as the picture shows, what I made looks like a Pico De Gallo salsa, too.

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Salsa

Developed by Marlys Crary, Cinco de Mayo, 2001)

  • 4 Roma tomatoes, seeded and diced
  • 1/3 white onion, finely diced
  • 1/8 green bell pepper, finely diced
  • 1 Jalapeno pepper, finely diced
  • 1 Tablespoon parsley, dried
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • small amount of olive oil to moisten

May add either or both:

1 can black beans, rinsed

1 cup frozen corn kernels, (or 1 can)

I was short on the Bell Pepper, so I left it out. I didn’t exactly measure the ingredients because I was using my Juliet tomatoes instead of the Roma tomatoes she lists; the Juliet is a cherry tomato with a texture like the Roma tomato- very meaty and not a lot of the center pulp.

I used fresh parsley right out of my herb garden, and as I have said in other recipes, once I cut it to bring it into the house, I tend to use all of it unmeasured.

I added a handful of frozen corn kernels; I put them in a sieve and ran water over them to get rid of the frost, and then dried them on paper towels. And, I added a bit of lime juice- not called for in Marlys’s recipe.

I think what is to be taken away from this exercise is that you want to capture the basics of a recipe, but you shouldn’t be a slave to it; you need to improvise with what you have, and have fun cooking. I think my spur-of-the-moment salsa turned out just as I wanted. It was fresh, and gave the meat a different taste that I enjoyed.

Zucchini Hash and Eggs

My neighbor Jill Swain gave me the idea for this recipe; she stopped over the other day and I gave her a zucchini and asked if she had any recipes for it. She first mentioned Zucchini Bread which we already have. Then she suggested zucchini with eggs; she said “Breakfast for supper is also good”.

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I talked it over with daughter Mindy and decided that we should keep the eggs separate from the hash until after we have cooked them. That way, you can fix your eggs however you like them. We also started calling the fixings a “hash”; I had to look that word up, and it originally meant any combination of chopped foods The idea of a hash has changed over time. More modernly, the idea of a hash has come to imply an inclusion of chopped meat with the other ingredients. This recipe is right on the edge of those definitions since it allows you to include bacon, or ham- any of the breakfast meats. But to be a zucchini hash, it has to include chopped zucchini.

The reason we decided to separate the eggs from the hash while cooking is so people that like runny eggs can still have those on top of the hash, and let them ooze down through the hash. Also the separation allows you to make an omelet with the hash inside. If you want to stir scrambled eggs into the hash, you can also do that.

That all said, it is difficult to write a recipe for the hash; if you are adding meat into your hash, it has to be sauted first. However if you are not using bacon, you might need to add a Tablespoon of oil in which to saute the ingredients. I will give you ideas, but you must feel free to do everything your own way. Add ingredients, delete ingredients, just have fun.

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Zucchini Hash with Eggs

Jill Swain, Mindy Crary

Per Serving:

  • 1 Tablespoon of oil unless you are using bacon or sausage
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup chopped breakfast meat e.g. bacon or ham or sausage
  • 1/4 cup chopped onion
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup chopped green pepper – Japapeno or Bell or …
  • 1/4 to 1/2 cup chopped zucchini
  • 1 or 2 cooked eggs – cooked as you like them

Saute the meat and vegetable ingredients; combine with the cooked eggs.

I used jalapeno pepper for one ingredient, and I like my eggs with runny yolks. To cook my eggs, I break them into the fry pan, add a little water to make steam, and put a lid on the pan. I have a clear lid, and I let the eggs cook until the glair around the yolk has turned white; at this point, the covering over the yolks has also started to turn white. Perfect eggs for me; the whites are not tough, and the yolks are still runny.