Tag Archives: sugar

Corn Bread

Marlys shows several optional ways for baking this recipe. I used the muffin tins, and everything came out perfectly. But, I remember Marlys making it in her old 10 inch cast iron skillet- the one she would never let me touch for fear I would wash it and ruin the seasoning of the iron. She also made it at times in the 8 inch square Corningware dish she had.

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Corn Bread

  • 1 1/2 cup yellow cornmeal
  • 1 1/2 cup sifted flour
  • 3 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 Tablespoon sugar
  • 2/3 cup oil
  • 1 1/2 cup milk
  • 3 eggs

Mix together with wire whisk. While mixing, heat oiled pan in oven;
add batter.
Bake at 400°F for:

  • 12 muffin tins——20 minutes
  • 8″ square pan——25 minutes
  • 10″ fry pan———25 minutes

A word of caution about the recipe. Heating the oiled pans in the oven might cause the oil to smoke and burn. The oven is at 400 degrees, which is hotter than most oils used in recipes can take. (In the recipe, the oil is okay; it is when it is in the direct heat that it breaks down). For an oil that can take the 400 degrees, look for peanut oil, or even sunflower oil. Generally seed or kernel oils are good to about 450 degrees. When looking at the back of my Mazola corn oil bottle, it says that it burns at 375 degrees; and I agree after trying to use it to oil the pans.

cornbread 005

Muffin tins seem to vary in size; my tins are about 2.75 inches across, and just over an inch deep. The recipe seems to make a perfect amount for 12 tins; each tin was filled to the top and I ran out of mix. And the baking time was also ideal; you can see the good color on the corn muffins.

Cinnamon Bread

This is the second of the flavored yeast breads that I enjoy, and make fairly often. In this case, I know that I have an easy target for any extra bread; Kris likes the cinnamon bread.
Cinnamon Bread 001
Again, this bread is made in the stand mixer with the bread hook attachment. It is different from the Dilly Bread in that it starts with milk, and takes the chill off the milk before adding it to the yeast and sugar. The Dilly Bread doesn’t use any milk as such; the closest it gets to milk is the cottage cheese.

In the list of ingredients, you will see that the butter, sugar and eggs are all divided; that is, the amount shown in the ingredient list is for two uses each. The first use will be in the bread dough, and the second use will be when forming the loaves of bread or for the egg white, during the last minutes of baking the loaves.

Cinnamon Bread

Makes 2 loaves

Ingredients

  • 1 cup milk
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1/3 cup butter plus 2 Tablespoons divided
  • 6 1/2 – 7 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 6 Tablespoons sugar plus 1/2 cup divided
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 packages active dry yeast
  • 3 eggs plus 1 egg white, at room temperature divided
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 egg white, beaten

Directions

Combine milk, water, and the 1/3 cup butter in a small saucepan. Heat over low heat until liquids are warm (120°F to 130°F); butter does not need to melt.

Place 6 cups flour, the 6 Tablespoons sugar, salt, and yeast in the mixer bowl with the dough hook attached. Slowly turn from its slowest “stir” speed to Speed 2 and mix for 15 seconds. Add the eggs, then the warm liquids, and “stir” for about 1 minute. Mix on Speed 2 for 1 minute longer.

Continuing on Speed 2, add the remaining flour, 1/2 cup at a time, until dough clings to hook and cleans sides of bowl, about 2 minutes. Knead on Speed 2 for 2 minutes longer.

Place in a greased bowl, turning to grease top. Cover; let rise in warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk.

Combine 1/2 cup sugar and cinnamon in small bow; set aside.

Punch dough down and divide in half. Roll each half into a rectangle that is as wide as the loaf pans, and as long as about 14 inches. The more rectangular you can make the rolled out dough, the easier it will be to roll it into a loaf. Melt the final 2 Tablespoons of butter and brush each half with melted butter and sprinkle with the cinnamon-sugar mixture. Roll dough tightly from the narrow side and shape into loaves. Place in two loaf pans with the seam side down.

Cover; let rise in a warm place, free from draft, until doubled in bulk, about 35 minutes. Bake at 375°F for 40 minutes. Remove from oven and brush with beaten egg white. Return to oven and bake 5 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from pans immediately and cool on wire racks.


Cinnamon Bread 003
I have already warned you about how the divided ingredients are used. Hopefully, I have broken them out strongly enough in the ingredient list that you will not accidentally use them at the wrong time.

I also like my flavors stronger that what I find this recipe gives me; I use extra sugar and cinnamon when I sprinkle the rolled out dough. To make certain that I don’t use too much cinnamon, I just double the quantity of both the sugar and cinnamon in the mixture.

Finally, I don’t like the top crust of the bread getting too crusty and hard, so I tent the loaves for the last ten minutes of the 40 minute baking time. I have to remove the tenting after brushing the loaves with the egg white to allow it to brown.

Chocolate Sauce

This is an interesting sauce; it is an old fashion way for making chocolate sauce. Now days, you just buy chocolate sauce in a can or a squeeze bottle.
The recipe is simple. The sauce is quite grainy. I remember that at times we had a pan of this sauce on the back of the stove ready to reheat and use. We used this sauce mostly on the Steamed Bread Pudding, but it was also good on ice cream.
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Chocolate Sauce

(Catharine P. Crary, 1963)

  • 8 squares unsweetened chocolate
  • 3/4 cups water
  • 2 cups sugar
  • 3/4 cup butter
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt

Combine ingredients in saucepan and heat until well blended.

Favorite Sauce

This is a very simple sauce that can take on fruit flavors by changing the first ingredient. I think Mother use to make this as a lemon sauce, but she did not show the exact values when Marlys got the recipe.

However, there is a issue that the amateur cook like myself might not catch; it can cause problems. I talk about it below.
Favorite Sauce

Favorite Sauce

  • 1 cup hot water (or fruit juice + 1 Tablespoon butter)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • Cook hot water, sugar, salt and cornstarch until clear and add vanilla.
    **Can stir in 1/2 cup whipped cream just before serving.

    Again, it is a cornstarch based sauce, which means it will set hard in the refrigerator, and need both whipping and heating to make it smooth again.

    I tried making it into a lemon sauce like I remembered Mother making, but I am not certain I got it right. With the wide variety of fruit juices on the market now, it could be fun to develop your own favorite flavor.

    I decided to make a strawberry flavored version of this sauce. I started with a pound of strawberries, and like the first steps of the Strawberry Devonshire Tart glaze, I used the food processor and then sieved the pulp to get a cup of strawberry juice. I then made the mistake of dumping everything into my sauce pan and turning the heat on. The mistake is that you need to dissolve the cornstarch in cold liquid- always! So my sauce had some lumps of undissolved cornstarch.

    The sauce was good except for that. But learn from my mistake; ALWAYS DISSOLVE CORNSTARCH IN COLD LIQUID.

    This makes me wonder about the first line of the recipe where it wants to use a cup of hot water; that just doesn’t sound right.