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Original Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookies

Everybody tries to improve on the Toll House cookie by making it bigger or adding to the flavor. But for me, the Original is still the best. There are enough parameters that you can manipulate to make the cookie just as you like it. By that, I mean it can be either a soft, chewy cookie, or a crisp, crunchy cookie. It all depends on what you want to do about cookie spread.

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Original Nestle Toll House Chocolate Chip Cookies

Ingredients

  • 2 1/4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup (2 sticks) butter, softened
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup packed brown sugar
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 2 large eggs
  • 2 cups (12 oz.) Nestle Toll House Semi-Sweet Chocolate Morsels
  • 1 cup chopped nuts*

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F.

Combine flour, baking soda and salt in small bowl. Beat butter, granulated sugar, brown sugar and vanilla extract in large mixer bowl until creamy. Add eggs, one at a time, beating well after each addition. Gradually beat in flour mixture. Stir in morsels and nuts. Drop by rounded tablespoon onto ungreased baking sheets.

Bake for 9 to 11 minutes or until golden brown. Cool on baking sheets for 2 minutes; remove to wire racks to cool completely. Makes about 5 dozen cookies.

*If omitting nuts, add 1 to 2 tablespoons of all-purpose flour.

Now we need to know how to control cookie spread in order to change the characteristic of the cookie from crisp, to chewy. When the cookie is cooking and spreads, it drys out and becomes crisp. To make a chewy cookie we want to delay the spread. The easiest way to do this is to allow the cookie to be less cooked. This can be done in a several ways- reducing the heat of the oven, reducing the time the cookie is in the heat, and finally, making the cookie colder before it goes into the oven. Also, be careful that you are not dropping the next pan of cookies onto warm cookie sheets; this starts the cooking process before the pans goes into the oven.

As the recipe is now, I get a medium crisp cookie. I have gotten more moist, chewier cookies in using all the different suggestions. I have reduced my cooking temperature by 25 degrees; at other times I have reduced the cooking time by 5 minutes. And I have placed the pan of cookies in the refrigerator for 20 minutes to cool them.

I think all the additions and variations on the chocolate chip cookie recipe have failed to make it any better. This original recipe still has a lot going for it.