Tag Archives: wine

Summer Squash Pasta

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This recipe is based on one by Eddie Jackson who was a contestant for “the Next Food Network Star”. I saw him make it and it looked good, and got good comments from the judges. And it is another interesting way to cook the summer squash with flavor.

I think you should look at the recipe as a guide to making summer squash pasta in your own way. For example, I did not use the mushrooms, and I probably added more red pepper flakes that suggested in the recipe. I also was making it for myself solo, so I only used the two zucchini squash; there was plenty of sauce for all the suggested squash.

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The trick to making the pasta is the vegetable peeler and going around the summer squash until you start to uncover the seeds. The outside peels might seem stiff at this point, but they soften nicely as they are sauted in the olive oil.

Summer Squash Pasta

courtesy Eddie Jackson

Ingredients

  • 4 Tablespoons Butter
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 shallot, finely chopped
  • 1/2 cup mushrooms, finely chopped
  • 6 ounces white wine
  • 1 lemon, zested and juiced
  • 2 yellow summer squash
  • 2 green zucchini
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • Salt and black pepper to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon Red Pepper flakes
  • 2 teaspoons grated Parmesan cheese
  • 10 cherry tomatoes
  • 2 Tablespoons fresh parsley, finely chopped

Directions

  • Melt the butter in a large saute pan and add the mushrooms, garlic and shallots. Saute for 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Add the wine, the lemon zest and juice. Simmer for 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Reduce the heat to low to keep the sauce warm until ready to use.
  • Using a vegetable peeler, carefully peel the squash until you reach the center, creating pasta-like vegetable noodles
  • Heat the olive oil in a large pan set over medium heat. Saute the vegetable noodles for 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Add the warm sauce, then add the pepper flakes and season with salt and pepper.
  • Add the tomatoes and cook for 1 to 2 minutes more.
  • Plate, and sprinkle with the Parmesan cheese and parsley.
  • I suggest cooking the tomatoes long enough to see their skins split; I found them easier to eat when the fork didn’t bounce off the skin.

Mulligatawny Soup

I received this recipe from my sister Rachael after telling her about the Mexican Soup I make and we use to have almost every lunch. I found this soup quite different from most Mulligatawny, and asked Corbin’s Grille for permission to publish the recipe on the WidowerRecipes web site. If you are in the northern Utah area, you might stop in at the Corbin’s Grille and try their cooking.

The notes in the recipe are by Rachael.

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This recipe is published here with the permission of Jake Garn, Owner/Operator of Corbin’s Grille.

Mulligatawny

  • © 2007 Corbin’s Grille, LLC
  • All Rights Reserved. Copies and all other uses besides private in-home use strictly prohibited.
  • Corbin’s Grille
  • 748 W. Heritage Park Blvd.
  • Layton, Utah 84041
  • Corbin’s Grille’s web site

Ingredients

  • 4 oz Carrots 3/8″ diced
  • 4 oz Celery 3/8″ diced
  • 4 oz Onions 3/8″ diced
  • 4 oz Leeks sliced 1/4″
  • 3 Tablespoons Bacon Grease
  • 6 Tablespoons Butter
  • 1 Tablespoons Curry powder (note: Madras)
  • 3/4 Cup Flour
  • 1 1/2 oz White wine
  • 5 Cups Chicken stock
  • 1 1/2 Cups Heavy cream
  • 1/2 Cup Cooked rice (note: risotto also very good- drain & rinse)
  • 1/2 Cup Diced ham
  • 1/2 Cup Diced cooked chicken
  • 1/2 Cup Corn (note: frozen)
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Hot sauce (note: Cholula)

Directions

Cook carrots, celery, onions and leeks in bacon grease and butter over medium heat until soft. Add curry powder and cook for an additional minute. Stir in flour and cook slowly for 3-4 minutes.

Add white wine and chicken stock. Reduce heat to simmer and whisk continuously until thick. Add rice, ham, chicken, corn and hot sauce. Stir in heavy cream and adjust seasonings and thickness.

I have reviewed several other recipes for Mulligatawny and find they are missing ingredients that are in this recipe. The most obvious examples are the leek, the bacon grease, the wine, the ham, the corn and the hot sauce. While these make a more complex recipe, I liked the results and think you will, too.

At first pass, I thought the soup would be difficult to bring together because of all the ingredients. The hard places for me would be the meats, and the bacon grease; my chicken and ham are frozen in 8 ounce pieces and so I would have to defrost pieces and cut them, and then determine how to use the rest. And, I separate my bacon into packages of 4 pieces each as soon as I get it home, and then cook it in the microwave on paper towels, so I don’t have bacon grease in the freezer. My sister suggested buying the meat at the deli section of the grocery store and asking for them to cut 4 ounces as a thick slab. For the bacon grease, I fried a package of bacon and used that grease; it was probably 2-3 Tablespoons. I used the bacon elsewhere, but I wonder if maybe I could have just crumbled it right into the soup.

If you have not worked with Leek before, then the rule is to separate the leaves and wash them several times to get all the sand and mud off them. Swish them around in a sink of water, changing the water two or three times as the mud settles out.

My other area of desiring to experiment is with the rice; the recipe calls for cooked rice, but we see in the Mexican Soup recipe that the rice is put into the soup and cooks as the soup simmers for an hour. I wonder if something similar could be done here; for example, cook the rice in some of the chicken stock on the side. Most white rices (Arborio, white) cook up at a ratio of 1 to 3; i.e., 1 cup of rice grains makes 3 cups of prepared rice. (For brown rice, the ratio is 1 to 2.5.) So, using white rice, you would need ½ cup / 3 or 1/6 cup of rice grain as a starting point. If my math is correct, this is 2 Tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons of rice grain. I need to test this idea. Rachael says that she always has a pot of cooked rice in her refrigerator, but I don’t and am looking for a way to not make extra cooked rice. If I learn something, I may update these comments at some future date.

Risotto rice is different in that it is cooked with flavorings, but I would think most of those are lost in the soup, so I don’t know if that makes a difference.

According to Rachael, the amount of hot sauce to add also seems to be very personal. Her friend only uses ½ teaspoon, while Rachael uses 2 teaspoons; I feel it could even use more and would probably try a full Tablespoon next time. And, I bought the Cholula hot sauce just for the soup, but I think you could use your own favorite brand. I did find the Madras curry to be hotter than what I had been buying as a curry powder; it seems to be more true to the tastes of India.

I think with these hints and suggestions, you should be ready to try this wonderful, hearty soup.